Making a business out of a podcast, social media and content? Interview with Tim Beanland

March 11, 2020

Making a business out of a podcast, social media and content? Interview with Tim Beanland
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Tim Beanland, who is the creator of the expert's blueprint and is also a podcasting expert. We talk about all things to do with podcasting, social media, marketing, video content, and how he has now created a business out of his podcast content.

I have also been a guest on Tim's podcast to talk about my experiences related to growing up with a single mother with BiPolar disorder type 1.

Click here to listen to his podcast

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Transcript
Joel Kleber:

Hi everyone and welcome to another episode of authentic convos with your host Joel Kleber. And thank you to everyone who's listened and subscribed and left a rating and review. I really do appreciate it. And I'm hoping to do a lot more content with some interesting people as well. But massive thanks my first two guests who were really open with Martin Gleason and Simon Hogan. So my guest today on this podcast was Tim bean land at Tim been land has a podcast called bean talking podcast with peak performance. He's a marketing guru and a podcast guru. A lot of respect for Tim, because he's, he's made a business out of his passion, which is podcasting. It's quite interesting how he's done that. So Part one is dedicated to him, telling us about his nation, what he does, and some marketing insights in podcasting, in general, some tips and advice. It's really cool actually, what he's created for himself, if you want to listen to his podcast, he just search been talking podcast is peak performance or Tim mainland, he's on all social channels as well. So he posts relentlessly, so you can check that out. And then part two of the episode, we then transitioned into more of a mental health focus. So Tim has bipolar type one. And you know, it's a big passion of mine is bipolar and raising awareness around that sort of spaces and on off continent. And Tim was so open and genuine about his experiences with it. And I just think it's such a great piece of unique content, and listening as well or watching if you watch the video version from him. So a massive thanks to Tim, I really do appreciate the openness, candor and honesty, because it's not easy for someone to put themselves on video and an audio, and just just reveal so much about themselves in regards to the mental health space and especially bipolar. So there's not enough content about it, which teams were off, which is why we did this. So massive thanks a team. So make sure you check out been talking podcast with peak performance. If you haven't subscribed or left a rating to authentic combos, podcast, make sure you do that definitely does help me out and we do it on YouTube as well. So subscribe to the channel. I'm on all the social platform. So just social links in that. And I appreciate you on who's listened so far. And stay tuned for another episode next week. Welcome to another episode of the authentic combos podcast, your host Joel Kleber and today's main studios, Timberland. So thanks for coming out. Thank you for having me, your background who Tim is. So Tim has a podcast called been talking podcast with peak performance. And he's actually come up before interview Jim, which is great, you know, Jim's very responsive. So I managed the accounts. And he reached out via them, he hooked it up. And he came out and did interview with him. And we got talking after that, in regards to you know how he's, you know, provided some value in regards to do a podcast or sort of staff, which is really cool. So this is sort of the podcast itself and how long you've been going for

Tim Beanland:

sure thing. Well, it actually started organically. When I was 18, I would go out and talk to business owners just for a notepad. So I did about 50 interviews or so talking to chief marketing officers, CEOs of companies just getting through LinkedIn just going Hey, I'm a university student, I want to have a chat. So I had this ability to go and have conversations. My first one was with a chief operating officer from vibrant marketing agency. He said, I'll give you 30 minutes, he ended up giving me two hours. So I had this ability to talk to people that absolutely loved it. Fast forward to I guess, two years ago, you can now buy recording equipment for pretty cheap, I sold an old laptop to buy a really cheap camera and just the zoom h5 recorder. And then I was talking to mentors and say, hey, I want to start this podcasting. And then one of them just said, stop talking about it and just do it. And and basically I said okay, well, will you be my first episode? And he said, Of course like you, you're talking about the scene, you've told me about trips, you've gone on talking to these marketing officers. And basically, yeah, when did the episode and then basically, consistency from there was a key thing. So reached out to a lot more people and did about 20 episodes by just checking a zoom recorder on the table. And off I went.

Joel Kleber:

And when did you start doing that?

Tim Beanland:

That was? So I was in university? Probably about 2024. Okay, and being out for nearly two years, two years now. Yeah. 26 Wow. Because you're pretty relentless. If anyone does suggest following your Instagram and Facebook and obviously the podcast cuz you're pretty relentless and lifted as well, from what I know, like you're literally two, three times a day, in short clips are posting the content. So yeah, the good thing about a podcast is that ability to take a 40 minute episode and clip it up into these grabbable sort of episodes. I find it's easy to then generate a lot of content. So yeah, I like that you said relentless and you also have the Gary Vee mansion, right? You know, you get that deck and he says, you know, what is it 67 pieces of content in a day? 100 I think is 100. In regards to what you do, you know you're taking a similar approach. Yeah. And we sort of did a similar thing here of James but not probably to the extent we we thought because we have so much material, we can create new content. But if you have all that that content and you keep repurposing it and keep pushing it out, and definitely Yeah, I think you touched on the key thing there, repurposing. You know, some people think they put a video out six months ago, and that's the only time they should put the video out. You create new followers over that six months. So if you've got a really good quality video, you can actually reshare that six months later, because you'll have a whole bunch of new followers that haven't seen it. I completely

Joel Kleber:

agree with you and the boys. We actually did a video of our call center I think I only posted like two months ago, but as well as the video, I posted again, the boys like why did you post that again? And you know, um, the similar view if it's good content, you're right, you'll build new followers in that space that haven't seen it, push it out again, if it's good content, or resonate? Yeah, I

Tim Beanland:

completely agree with that. I mean, a perfect example. Like, I've probably re watched videos analyzing Infinity War about two times, or we watch different YouTube videos that I thought were funny, like two or three minutes, so people will rewatch the content. So there's sort of that resharing but then it's also repurposing so creating, maybe like Instagram posts via quotes from episodes like we might say something on this show that you can then quote up and that does really well on Instagram. Yeah. So with the platforms, what are you on yourself? Yeah, so Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, and tik tok. Now, what about Tick tock, tick tock every month at all the times getting pushed online everywhere. So I think the tick tock, I love it. So I grew a hobby account was called rescue turtle to 20,000 followers in about three to four weeks. This is ridiculous, ridiculous, ridiculous spike of growth was actually my girlfriend's graduation. And my phone kept buzzing like on fire. And I was like, What is it? Why is it buzzing. And it got to a point in the graduation where it was silence, I pulled up my phone, and I saw like 99 plus notifications. And the thing had grown from like 400 followers to then to K followers in like, two hours. What had happened was the video, one of my videos got on the for you page, and it was emotional and drawing enough and captivating and all that kind of stuff. And then it just took off from there. So you just say this organic growth of tik tok was really fascinating. And what video for yours was the most view. It's this video of a turtle that is swimming along in the ocean, and they've got this shell stuck on the back of them. So I've put the subtitles, and this is human diving above subtitles. Excuse me, human, can you help me get the shell off my back. And then essentially, the human. Eventually, the turtle swims close up to the camera so people can see it. The human takes the shell off the turtle and throws it back in the ocean. But there's also we've taped off his music, you put music behind it, I'll put an emotional song. You just got to think what's going to pull on people's heartstrings. So that's what I did. And yeah, it took off and I had enough content. Before that post that people then went back and re watch the other stuff. So I think that's a tip with any social media posting or any podcast. If you have a backlog of catalogs, it's like binge culture, Netflix binge culture, if one video takes off, it only takes one video, then people will go back and rewatch everything else. Not everyone will but a certain percentage on those will be your fans and your followers.

Joel Kleber:

Now did you on your Tick tock, you do a lot of selfie mode videos, especially on Instagram as well. Yeah. So is that something you're initially comfortable with? Because it's something I find a problem of trying to get. I met a lot of people in what I do. And they're really great at those personalities huge off camera. As soon as I don't know what it is that camera goes is they get a feeling or something. And it's just shell.

Tim Beanland:

Yeah. So it's something I've found with podcasting as well. The thing is, business owners or people whatever they know what they're talking about. But as soon as you check a camera in front of them, they start to get nervous, and they freak out. Now to answer your question for me. I used to do selfie videos and post them on Facebook when I was 18. Because I'd be learning stuff from mentors. And that gave me a bit of confidence to do it. But it's not, you know, the amount of retakes that I was doing because you get nervous, it's a thing. So but for people that I suppose want to make video, it's kind of just make sure that you get enough takes, but it's you got to realize that perfection is the enemy of creativity. So if you want this picture, perfect video picture, perfect thing, you're not going to get it. So but just make sure that you can get something out there and don't judge yourself. I guess that's helped me. By hidden today. When I got here, I was like, I'm back at Jim's office. And then I flipped the camera onto me doing an interview with job. But those microglitter content makes so much of a difference. When do you need to post 50 to 100 things a day. tell people what you're doing your day and do it in a point of view, sort of format and it's engaging. Yeah, it's documenting your journey and Yep. And I think if some people get discouraged that they get a negative comment. Where's the market? good ones, I just stopped consuming of comment which is, which is pretty silly. Yeah, it's hard. Like, okay, that turtle video that I was talking about. It's a very wholesome video. It's just some bloke swimming next to a turtle taking yourself the turtle putting it back. I got hate comments on that video, you know, was an example. Yeah, there's people that said, You're not even helping the turtle. That was a symbiotic relationship that the turtle was having the shell, right? You've just frozen the shell back in the ocean, someone else is gonna like, this is a happy video yet, there's still hate. I think it's very easy. And I commented back to those pipes. I said, Look, thanks for the comment. I really appreciate it. And I hope everything is well in your world. Because if somebody spits venom to you, or hate or negativity on a comment, I see it as a reflection on them. Not a reflection on your content. If they take the time out of their day to troll you, they must be in a really bad spot. Yeah, I agree. And I think that's just you know, online is like just out of control. I manage a lot of comments and we know with our content, we might post three grades bit of content a day across mobile platforms, and the one time that say there's a spelling mistake or they say something said incorrectly in the video, someone will jump on and go oh, Baba, bah bah bah. It's like they've been watching 100 videos and not said one good thing on engage with the content yet the one time you do something, you know, it's funny that actually helps your engagement. So it does I will welcome troll comments. Sometimes pages have deliberately made spelling mistakes so that people pick them up. Right it can it can be attacked a tactic you deliberately make a spelling mistake so some grammar person picks it up and goes will you do that?

Joel Kleber:

Yeah, it's it's quite funny it's definitely at the moment we're doing a lot of arm branches inquiry ads and Facebook and some of the comments like this misinformation it's hilarious so traditional standard replies like you know from a cable companies like this I love this Robin a little bit more leeway with me. I'll be be more of a smile. So for example, there was one Wade said are you know why? Why? Why pay money to Jim to sit in his gold house gold house now Gold Coast penthouse. Rihanna said you know, lol big long. I said, I said, you know, Chen, you know, a little bit condescending. So Jim lives at a normal full story for four bedroom brick house in mooroolbark. Here's a picture of his house, Rafi. I mean, I'll get like 10 likes or whatever. Robert Morris traditional company would like you know.

Tim Beanland:

You've got a legal background, haven't you? I did. I did it. Laureen Yeah, so it would be very tempting for you to go down the scripted company route but that's not social media. That's very true. But the way I look at is it for me, like if you look at Woolworths and Coles when they get like a customer clarify in a second. Yeah, it will really reply from the terrible like it does that we reply from the company though from calls does so well. Now. They might also complain about oh, you know, I bought 12 eggs and blah blah blah like an elaborate thing and say something really to it. And yeah, that comment, you know, that feels human that builds some engagement in the brain. The best ones to do it is twisties you've ever seen twist I'd say twist is not going I don't know if it's still the same but like to wonder two years ago twisties their comments back to people were hilarious, right? Wendy's in America in America do it really well like that? Even? They seems like people would tweet at Wendy's Should I go to McDonald's? And it's like, like, why they would do something like not like obviously no, but it would be like no, why would you put your body for that? Yeah, something like that. They'd be a little bit more risky. Which really works that polarizing view of non scripted non commercial Don't be scared to be human and I think yeah, that's what I liked about how you comment on Jim's stuff and we buy it Yeah, I just think it's just it's also be more fun as well you know if you've taken the time to be that native and not going to be a franchisee anyway, most likely going to be a customer anyways, you know, we're a competition so you look at their profile you see what they work at they're either a rival business handyman or whatever they are, of course gonna try and throw shade so you can you can definitely use this to your advantage what we found is we actually account franchise owner who jumping out comments now and actually say, you know, James is the best thing I've ever done. You know, and I do a big long winded thing and a great example is we had a franchisee we have a franchise a foreign right doesn't get us too much. But Jim jumps on the regular there's a franchisee I know he's nicknamed the white side, but he's always giving him a hard time. But this franchisee actually jumped on one of the comments and wrote a massive paragraph saying this is the best thing you know, 14 years ever done. I'll give you a no BS thing anyone to pay me this sort of stuff as well. So I just think it's it's one of those things have been found with an arm if your brand is strong enough people you know will get it but being in a position where we're allowed to do it as well as possible. It's amazing. The gym has that sort of awareness I guess to go you know what I'm gonna give Joel a bit of control here and say yeah, we can we can do that because that makes his brand so much better. If you're just that way with people it's it's fantastic. Yeah, I like to be a bit Smart LTE radio James live and stuff and we get some funny comments and you know, maybe it's better or smarter back to them is always the best way to go. And to touch on the people fighting for you in your comments, your true fans, your true customers will back you up in comments which you've just seen exactly why not, it's really refreshing. There are brand champions, other franchisees and if they're not happy, not going to say. So to get them to write a positive thing is so much harder than to write it if a negative thing so which has been very refreshing, really refreshing. So back to the subject of your podcasts yourself. So initially trying to reach out to get people is pretty, pretty impressive at an 18 year old, you're going out seeking people and speaking to them. And then that, let's say your first your first five to 10 guests, it was just a simple email at Richie did to him all, I was lucky because from 18, I've been building up a network from 18. I've been having those notebook conversations or going to networking events or doing that kind of thing. I've always been, I guess it's luck in genetics, and whatever my makeup is, I've always been comfortable reaching out to people. So it would just be a matter of figuring out who's in my local network that I've had. I've walked away from a conversation because this was another reason why the show started. I was walking away from conversations with mentors, people like Jordan, Fabian, Allen, all these people and going, why didn't I record that? So to those people, I'd be like, Warren, who were those conversations? They're my friends, essentially. And they'll come on the show. So is the local network first. And then literally, the best question you could ask as a podcaster is, hey, at the end of the show, who should I interview next? Yeah, who do you know that that would make a good story? Who do you know, that would fit with a peak performer with an authentic conversation? Who Who do you know, it's that sort of six degrees of separation kind of thing? And so my question, my question to you is, how did you know because this is now your business? Yeah. Which is quite impressive. So it's interesting for me, because you went out and you sought all these mentors, I would say maybe was initially to work as a CMA to work your way up and work in that field. Yeah, it was, that was the thing. Like I went to a university information night that told me Hey, go and reach out to people. And I took the, like, 99% of people won't, where they'll go to a seminar and information like they weren't put into action and stuff. Because they'll convince themselves not to do it. But Oh, cool. I'll give it a go. So yeah, that was the intention to start with was how can I network to get a marketing job after my degree? But no, it's now? Yeah. Because that's your full time, full time gig and you do it a little bit differently. So most people, if they want to do a podcast, want to monetize sponsorships, whereas your approach is different. Yeah, well, because I've got a marketing background, I have a conversation with a business owner at the end of the show, where I go, look, we just got some amazing stuff there for your business. You explained case studies. Remember that moment where you took the car dealership from last making the positive making? And you made me go? Well, I'm pretty sure if we put that through social media make a whole bunch of other people go well as well. Yeah. Can you chop that up? For me? Of course I can. I can, I can. What if I found about 10 to 20 other clips for you, that then gives you a month to two months worth of content, all done for you in 20 to 30 minutes of your time. You've just sat there and done the interview. Obviously, a little bit more work for me, on the back end to edit your video guys here. No, no editing. But creating that content that's highly engaging for business owners is the next step. So and it just the people that I've worked with, they see the clips and go, this is amazing, because it's them explaining concepts in an authentic way. Are you still surprised by the lack of willingness by some businesses to actually produce video contents? Yeah, it's 2020. I don't know why. Well, I don't know why. But it shocks me that they don't do the selfie stories. They don't even do the the really easy stuff, just whipping out your phone and doing a quick video. Or, you know, something I do with my clients is when I drop off, I can physically drop off files to clients down from a USB stick. Yeah, you can do them digitally. But I do that because then I can show them the videos, see if they're happy with it, and then take a selfie video with them and go, what do you think, Mr. testimonial isn't testimony? Yeah. But I do that because I'm a marketer. Now, I've realized that a business owner doesn't do marketing videos, because it's just another thing on the long list of things to do. So it's like the personal trainer who tells you to go to the gym every day. It's easy for the personal trainer to go to the gym every day because that's their job. It's their job to lift weights. It's a job to then teach people to lift weights. as a marketer. It's my job to create content. That's why I'm so proud. about it because it's just natural to me. And I think business owners stay away from video because it's not natural. And they're also scared of comments or those negative comments or talking about they're scared of stuff coming back to them, which I think as we've discussed, it shouldn't stop you at all. I agree. I think it's sort of interesting. You sort of see big businesses now good examples, the ANZ and he's got a podcast Yeah, and it's a real emotionally like it's pretty contrived Westpac or CBI if you want to podcast give me a very contrived stories about business owners, right? So emotional connection like aims at facilitating facilitated this story or ions in support says community event like it's all like, if you can put the if you can, it's installed uncontrived However, it does is it script is a script to do a little bit there definitely put a lot of work into it. Like it'd be pretty, you know, have to go once the contents done, I would say I'd have to get pretty well scrutinized before even gets released, which is my frustration with a lot of businesses. I know we do some partnership videos sometimes. And is that just the scrutiny of the actual content itself, like it has to be perfect, it has to show the product or you know, in the perfect most perfect light, it can't say anything that's actually it's a red tape, red tape, it's fashion was classy. We basically basically got a free license. You know, there'll be there'll be times like every month for I'll release a video that check in with someone and I'll say Oh, yeah, we shouldn't have said this. Can you please leave which is which I don't mind doing. But I think it's just the free license we have internally is a lot better words. I just get frustrated by some of the companies about everything has to be perfect. It's not genuine on customers people know like, you know, online now for the video. Like if it's too polished, yeah. Or you know, it's a sales pitch you just turned off the brand straight on straight away. And I just think these days big businesses especially like just this this to the to polished, they don't they don't believe in documenting their day. I think I've got such good smelling leaving documents in the day. Yeah, well, and that's what I sort of think I look at it like an example like the ANZ CEO Shane. He's I'm Shane, someone who does series at local businesses, which was really, really cool was so polished, your scripted and I just like people know, you're talking a bunch of garbage. You know, it's not a junior, I'd be interested to see the stats on because there is still a place for polished video, there's still a place for it. And I think a big bank that has a budget to fry behind really big, you know, expensive film crews. You know, I know, I know, some guys that do some great work with mining companies and fight MD and all that kind of stuff. And, you know, for the TV commercial or the, you know, the end of your funnel advertisement. That's the place for Polish stuff. And it still works. But if you want people to engage with video, that's what I really love the name of this podcast authentic. You're not sure if you're gonna share it on teams, because it's so authentic, social, that names fantastic, because you're just having authentic conversations with people. And that's what it's all about finding what's relatable and shareable. So, you know, yeah, it was a good better than doing nothing if you go and do that business series, well done. But if he did a day in the life of the CEO, like, correct, you know, you've done a day in the life of Jim Yeah, Gary Vee does, you know weekly V, where it's just, this gets millions of views. And then people relate that to the person, they like the company to the person. And then, you know, a business principle is we do business with people we know like, and trust can it's not great to you and brands or people. Yeah, show the people in the branch or the people in the business who drove forward. Yeah, it doesn't have to be a contrived, polished piece all the time and give an insight into what you do, which is why we do so much content with Jim. Yeah, there's a reason for doing it. Because all this only for nine years. And always everything that you hear on a podcast or video, if you might have heard that for so many years before. And so why don't we do so why don't you put it out there? Correct. So I was basically Jim was really good and no restrictions. And then we do a weekly podcast now we do Facebook, live, all that sort of stuff. And it's been good for the brand. You know, when most franchising industry at the moment, it tends to be a little bit of a net decline, just because a lot of the bad press or the retail based ones gyms is still holding steady. And I think it's because of just the transparency, the transparency in the company, like you buy a franchise, you know, from jeans, you don't have to really franchisees, really, you can just watch, you know, an hour a week with Jim on video in here, his thoughts, you'll know exactly what you're buying into sort of a powerful thing. You've now got all this content, you can not only distribute it through social media, you can distribute it for email, you can distribute it for you could make up letters and then have a QR code at the bottom that says go and watch this video. Yeah. And that's what we're starting to do now. So we obviously we capture, like, for example, the call center so everyone knows what the course actually does. Now, our trainings captured as well. We definitely we capture a lot of content with our divisional owners and our franchisees and we try and do it off the cuff. You know, we get we always have questions prepared before but in regards to the answers provided, I don't know what this is coming out and might say good things or bad things. And I like it when it's that case. Yeah, it must be a good thing and a bit of bad so it's polarizing. Yeah, you got to do polarizing stuff. And it's also Reality of running a business to you know, for example, a franchise recruitment video, you might have somebody will say, Oh, you know, the first use be tough, but once you get through it, you're right. Where some other people might say, we can't put that in this, you know, but it's it's just keeping that's that's honesty. Yeah, I agree. And that's the thing we have to be. I think businesses have to be a lot more honest. I think people can see through a lot of, you know, that we all just constantly marketed to all the time, if they can see something that's genuine and authentic and resonates with them. I don't relate to your brand. But yeah, and I think in franchising, in particular, you have to do that because the bad press, you know, yeah, well, one franchise, I mean, I've worked for franchise businesses before. And one if one franchise stuffs up so you go to McDonald's in Croydon and McDonald's in Croydon and makes you a crappy burger. Are you going to be upset with that location? Are you going to be upset with McDonald's? You won't be upset with McDonald's people don't understand that sometimes bad performance by one single franchise is an outlier and doesn't reflect the whole company. Yeah. And with your with your conversation with Jim he would have heard that as well. You know, we have one Jim something franchisee does a bad job for a customer. And it's always I'll never use teams again. It's as everyone else with the same franchise rush. And so that's always so strident on customer service and stuff like that. But I'm gonna ask you with your podcasts as well. So how many roughly Do you do a week, I'm aiming to publish two a week to it. Like I was my goal, this Saturday was one. But then I, as you say, prolific turning to a stage now where people are asking me to be on the show. So I'm getting some dams for Instagram. So there's a point now where I'm getting a big backlog of episodes, which I love. You know, it means I've got the ability to publish two a week. I wanted to do one. But I just figure with algorithms of YouTube with everything like that. They like to see consistent, and quantity of content. So if I can bring one out and published one on Monday night to advertise for Tuesday, and then I put one out Thursday night to advertise on Friday.

Unknown:

Yeah,

Tim Beanland:

I started that last week. And that's great. And do you plan on this moving for doing this as your for obviously she full time? Yeah. Now she's great, very impressive. So do you have What do you plan on building with the business and solid gas? My aim is to get this to a point where I just go and interview people. You know, I I love the setup that you guys have got here, you've got to media blokes, you've got the lighting, you've got a dedicated room, I would love to have, you know, a studio that's in the city or just you know, in Collingwood or somewhere there that I can, you know, set up, set up podcast and go, Hey, come to my studio. These are things sort of maybe 234 years down the track, but that's sort of where I want to take it. And I really want to talk to the peak performers in every field. So it has been business owners, but I recently interviewed a Paralympian shout out to Hannah. Thank you. And yeah, just want to get into sports stars peak performance, but just what makes people successful? And then how do we take those lessons from peak performance and then adapt them to our lifestyles? So we can then perform at our best your service potential with what you just said them? Because magasin the studio in the studio, you could do master classes where you teach people up to it, you could take all the old transcripts from the conversation, you could do an evil, you could do Ah, definitely. So when I get to 100 episodes, I will make a book and put transcripts of that in. I'm also Yeah, I also am teaching people how to start their own podcast as well. So there's a lot of skills that I've picked up over the last two years doing this that I'm now teaching for the producer behind for other podcasts. Well, one of the one of which isn't published yet. But also doing, I'll go in, I'll do a half day with someone and I'll say, Well, okay, what do you want to do? Do you want to interview two people? Or do you just want it yourself? What do you want to do? I'll teach him how to use their equipment. Have them. Give them a rundown of how they distributed to Spotify, iTunes, SoundCloud, all of all of that. And the goal is in that half day session to give them one episode. So one episode done completed. So they've got the ball and momentum because momentum is so key. You know, I've been through because of health reasons, we'll get into it, but I went through a period where I stopped and that wasn't good. The statistics plummets. So consistency is really key. And I just want to get people the ball rolling. So in that half day session, they then come out with this is the equipment, this is how to use it. This is the software. This is how you publish. And don't worry about the editing because if you want to work Probably I can I can take that on as well, because there's a great new business you've created. Like it's I don't know how many people would be doing that as a service, but it's pretty sounds like a pretty nice nation. Yeah, thank you. I'm really excited about it. Yeah, it's, you know, people say, do what you love doing, and you'll never work a day in your life. That's truly what this is. So, you know, I get up every day now we have a sense of purpose and passion. And I just love teaching people like, podcasts are very popular at the moment, I still think there's a lot of growth to go and pop podcast, but the amount of people that go I want to start a podcast but don't know how to do it don't know what the right gear to buy. Because as I said, I started on a budget. I had 800 bucks 500 bucks to start a podcast. And I did. Anybody said just before back previously was just starting, right. But my thing is, people want to do professional barbeskew or whatever, just just start start. Yeah, and just refine what you're doing. You're more comfortable talking to people put it out there consistency as well. You know, check out Tim's stuff because Tim's very consistent regards to the selfie stuff, which is which is really good. I don't know if you're comfortable with that initially. But when I was 18, I wasn't right. I was luckily I was doing sales roles. So that gave me confidence. But it takes time it takes you know, do I have do five episode do five selfie videos, publish them and see what happens. But you're never gonna find out if you don't do it. You script match or you write it down for yourself or just off the cuff? I don't know. Look, I am a fan of scripts. If you're doing cold calls, and you're doing sales, like you don't know what he's saying, but I think you have an idea. I do it. I put it out. If I try and script something, I'll get it perfect. It's just going to stop me from doing it. So no, no scripting. Thanks for listening to Part One of the podcast part two will be another episode which you should be able to download and listen to straightaway. So check that one out because it's all about mental health. So we go into that sort of that's always split into two parts. Part One was the the podcast and a nice business about it. And then Part Two was the mental health side. So make sure you listen to that one cuz I think it's quite insightful.

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Tim Beanland

Podcaster and business owner

Tim Beanland is a podcast host and also podcasting expert whose business is helping others get their message out there online. He is a university qualified marketer and expert on social media. Tim is also a mental health advocate who suffers from BiPolar Disorder Type 2.